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Patient Stories

Kirsty Birney

Kirstey Birney

Kirsty Birney

In 2010 I had my first miscarriage I thought it was my fault. I was 25, just married and hadn't been eating the best, was drinking most weekends and had a busy life, so I buried all my feelings of guilt and hurt, put on a smile and got on with life.

In December 2014 I fell pregnant again and we were overjoyed. But, unfortunately, our happiness turned to sorrow when on Boxing Day, at ten weeks pregnant, it was confirmed I had lost our baby. The hurt was unbearable and the guilt terrible. I felt I had let my husband down and was a failure and not worthy to be a mum.

Caroline Jackson

Caroline Jackson

Caroline Jackson

I had two early miscarriages in 2008 after trying for a baby for over a year. One was in May and one in September at around seven weeks. I was under the care of fertility doctors, as I had also been diagnosed with polycystic ovaries. I had been on fertility drugs during the time I had the miscarriages, and continued to take them afterwards to aid my fertility.

Unfortunately, one year later and I had had no further pregnancies. I know it is an awful thing to say, but I was desperate to get pregnant again so I would lose the baby and then I could get referred for more tests but was also terrified of being pregnant again in case I lost it, if that makes any sense?

Eddie Mackay

Eddie Mackay

Eddie Mackay

My name is Edward Mackay, Eddie. In 2004 I turned thirty years of age. I was a fit and healthy non-drinker/non-smoker who worked for the local wildlife trust. In December of that year I was bedridden and diagnosed with flu. I don't remember much of this as the fatigue, the worst limb pain I had ever experienced and the difficulty concentrating because of the headaches makes this period a bit hazy for me. After about a week I was back on my feet but on the evening of 27th January 2005, over the course of one and a half hours, my left leg went from being a bit sore to landing me in A&E with a full leg DVT.

Sangi Patel

Sangi Patel

Sangi Patel

I was rushed into St Thomas’ Hospital in London with suspected meningitis in November 2002 and discharged five days later with high dose pain relief. I was twenty years old and had to take time off from my university course as I simply could not function.

My symptoms were classic of meningitis with extreme photophobia, a very stiff neck, big rash and I honestly thought my head was going to explode!

Ann Sumra

Ann Sumra

Ann Sumra

I am a 62 year old female and am a paediatric physiotherapist by profession and, up until my late 40s, was very active and fit.

About fifteen years ago I had an incident with a screamingly bad headache in the night. I took pain killers and went back to sleep. The next morning I felt strange on my right side, but my husband said I looked fine. I went to work, but my balance and coordination were poor.

Lucy Thomas

Lucy Thomas

Lucy Thomas

I’d always been lead to believe that I wouldn’t be able to conceive, as I have Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. My husband and I had been together ten years, and we’d always assumed we wouldn’t be able to start a family of our own. However, after returning from Australia to visit our new nephew, we decided we’d like to try for a family, and planned to see a fertility specialist; so it came as a great and welcome surprise that I suddenly fell pregnant in January 2014, without any intervention.

Beth Willis

Beth Willis

Beth Willis

I was an extremely fit and active 18 year old when I was admitted to hospital with a suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). After a week on heparin injections I was sent home, being told that the symptoms were inconclusive and it was probably pleurisy. I was given some painkillers and no further tests were run. I was keen to get on with my A-levels and so didn't ask any more questions.

My medical history at this point showed I had suffered badly from Glandular Fever at 13, I had been diagnosed with Reynaud's and had a history of skin rashes in hot weather but these things were not looked in to.

Yvonne Wren

Yvonne Wren

Yvonne Wren

I received confirmation of my diagnosis of Hughes Syndrome (antiphospholipid syndrome) at St Thomas' Hospital on 21st April 2005. I was 52 years old.

I had never been someone who suffered from headaches but I had had a couple of migraine type attacks through each of my two pregnancies in the 1980s and subsequently once or twice a year after that.

In 1983, aged 50, I suffered one of these attacks at work resulting in a severe headache, photophobia, flashing lights, fragmented vision, impaired memory, inability to process actions and failure to recognise my colleagues.

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